Monday, February 26, 2024

The Most Popular Vintage Baby Names

Encourage us by following our pinterest

[pit-profile url=”https://www.pinterest.com/kingdomofbaby/”]

A wide array of names are all over there as people turned to be creative to this over time. Different derivatives that range from colors, fruits, plants, places, animals, occupations and the like. Well, this, of course, depends on the taste and preference of the parents. Just push your hopes high that they are on their right minds while filling out that blank space of your birth name on that piece of sheet. While some parents prefer to name their babies after a holy biblical persona or an alluring goddess and a compelling god from Greek mythology; others may take it from that old, classic yet timeless origin – vintage names. Maybe some parents wanted to relive their youth and take down a memory lane that is why giving their baby a vintage name would be a great idea. Listed below are vintage names that never went out of style. Be sure to check ‘em out in case you haven’t come up with a name for your baby yet.


Theodore:

Theodore is a Greek name, meaning ‘God’s gift’. A well-known short form for Theodore is Theo.

Matilda:

The name derives from the two Old High German words “math” and “hild”, meaning “mighty in battle”.

Spencer:

Spencer is an old English name, meaning “guardian”.

Pauline:

Pauline is a name with Latin origin, meaning “small”. It was a very popular name between the 1940s and the 1960s.

Richard:

This name is of German origin, meaning “strong in rule” or “brave power”.

Rosemary:

The name derives from the rosemary plant. However, the name also has a Latin origin, meaning “dew of the sea”.

Leonard:

Leonard is an Old German name, meaning “lion strength”.

Clara:

Clara is a name of Latin origin and means “bright, clear”. The name is well-known from the ballet “The Nutcracker”.

Jonah:

Jonah is a biblical and Hebrew name, meaning “dove”.

Abigail:

This name has a Hebrew origin and means “my father is joyful”. In the Old Testament Abigail was the wife of David, renowned for her beauty and wisdom.

Adrian:

Adrian is a Latin name, meaning “man of Adria”. Its ultimate origin is most likely from the Venetic and Illyrian word “adur”, meaning “sea” or “water”.

Esther:

Persian, meaning “star”. Additionally, the name could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess Ishtar.

Emery:

A German name means “brave” and “powerful”. It can be a name for both girls and boys.

Constance:

Latin, meaning ‘steadfast’. Oscar Wilde’s wife was called Constance Lloyd.

Frederick:

Frederick is the English form for the German name Friedrich, meaning “peaceful ruler”.

Elias:

Elias is of Greek origin and a form of the name Elijah. The original meaning is “Lord is my God”.

Ruth:

Hebrew, meaning “compassionate friend” and “vision of beauty”. The name was really popular in the 1890s.

Gerald:

German, meaning “rule of the spear”. The Englisch spelling of the name is Jerrold.

Adelia:

This German name was very popular in the 1890s and means “noble”. Alternative spellings are Adelya, Adeliah.

Dorothy: 

Greek, meaning ‘gift of God’. Famous Dorothys include the central character in The Wizard of Oz and Dorothy Hodgkin, who won a Nobel Prize for chemistry.

Alberta:

From the Old German for ‘noble, bright, famous’. Also the name of a province in Canada.

Beatrice:

Originated from Latin meaning ‘blessed’ or ‘voyager’. A recent rapid riser in names for girls in the UK. Famous Beatrices include children’s book author Beatrix Potter and Princess Beatrice, granddaughter of Queen Elizabeth II.

Alexander:

Greek, meaning ‘defender of mankind’. Alexander the Great was an undefeated fourth-century king whose empire stretched from Greece to modern Pakistan. Alec Baldwin is an Oscar and Emmy-nominated actor. Sir Alec Guiness is the renowned actor whose illustrious career took him from Shakespeare on stage to Hollywood blockbusters.

Edith:

English name that means ‘prosperity through battle’. Pulitzer Prize-winner Edith Wharton is the author of The Age of Innocence. Actress Edie Falco starred in The Sopranos.

Elizabeth:

Came from Hebrew which means ‘consecrated to God’. Two queens of England have been named this: Queen Elizabeth I ruled England from 1558 to 1603, and Queen Elizabeth II has been on the throne since 1952. Enduringly popular, especially with its many variants and shortened forms including Beth, Lizzie, and Libby.

Fabian:

The name means ‘one who grows beans’. Also associated with the teen pop sensation Fabian in the 1950s and 1960s.

Evelyn:

It means ‘hazelnut’. Used as a name for girls and boys equally. Dame Evelyn Glennie is a multi-award winning Scottish virtuoso percussionist, despite being profoundly deaf. German, meaning ‘hazelnut’. Evelyn Waugh is the author of Brideshead Revisited, Decline and Fall and Scoop.

Herbert:

Came from Herb Old German which means ‘illustrious warrior’. Herbert Hoover was a President of the United States and founder of the FBI.

Emily:

Latin, meaning ‘rival, eager’. Emily Dickinson is one of the most well- known poets of the nineteenth century. A very popular name choice in recent years.

Margaret:

Greek, meaning ‘pearl’. Famous Margarets include former prime minister Margaret Thatcher, author Margaret Atwood, and actress Margaret Rutherford. Famous Maggies include actresses Maggie Gyllenhaal and Maggie Grace, and the song ‘Maggie May’ by Rod Stewert.

Obama:

African, meaning ‘crooked’. Made famous by the President of the USA, Barack Obama.

Ronald:

Norse, meaning ‘mountain of strength’. Hollywood actor Ronald Reagan became the 40th president of the United States.

Sarah:

Hebrew, meaning ‘princess’. Also an important character in the Bible. A particularly popular name in the 1960s.

Maude:

German, meaning ‘battle-mighty’. Usually associated with the character of Maude Flanders from The Simpsons or the film Harold and Maude.

Nanette:

French, meaning ‘grace’. No, No Nanette is a musical comedy from the 1920s. Nanette Lepor is an American fashion designer and Nanette Newman is a British actress.

Stanley:

English, meaning ‘stony meadow’. Famous Stanleys include children’s character Flat Stanley, film director Stanley Kubrick and actor Stanley Tucci.

Wilmer:

English Teutonic, meaning ‘famously resolute’. Wilmer Eduardo Valderrama is an American actor. Wilmer Allison was a tennis champion in the 1930s.

Nicola:

Greek, meaning ‘victory of the people’. Nicola is a boys’ name in Italy but became widely used in England and Germany as a girls’ name, perhaps due to the – an ending of the name. As a girls’ name in England, it was especially popular around the 1960s–1970s. Nicole Kidman is an Oscar-winning Australian actress. Nicole Farhi is a French fashion designer and sculptor.

Rachel:

Rachel is a figure in the Bible. A very popular name during the 1960s and 1970s, especially. Famous Rachels include actresses Rachel Weisz and Rachel Bilson and the characters of Rachel Berry from Glee and Rachel Green from Friends. 

Selma:

German, meaning ‘Godly helmet’. Versatile actress Selma Blair has starred in a range of film genres as well as Hollywood hits.

Viva:

Latin, meaning ‘alive’. Actress Viva was one of Andy Warhol’s muses during the 1960s.
If you want to give your baby a very classic name that would go to the sound of the old times then what we provided you above will be perfect! However, if those did not fit your taste well we have other collections here such as nautical baby names if you’re into that breeze of the ocean.

Read also:

Related Posts

Comments

Stay Connected

spot_img

Recent Stories